Sunday, May 10, 2009

Spring-Time Part IV

Last weekend I ventured to the National Forest area, and on the way home I stopped to take a gander at the trout at the Trout Hatchery...These are golden rainbow trout, a result of selective breeding. It's quite a story, but here is the result...

Please take note: The water was not as clear as I would have liked, as we have had nearly two weeks of considerable rainfall, so the water was high, and the water is pumped in from the stream which was silty...



Looking downstream, or south on the North Fork of the Cherry River...



There were several areas, like this one where the water was pouring down the mountainside from all the rain, and actually made for waterfalls of sorts...There was another stream like this one where I had spotted a mink travelling up and down the stream side trying to find food...although, this time, I believe the high water must have filled his home, as they live in the sides of the banks of streams in holes, where they sleep and raise their young...



This is a photo of the dogwood tree in the yard that was in full bloom that I had taken after returning home from the trip up in the high country...



Well, a week has passed and spring is in high gear, the tiny green leaves coming out on the trees in the forest are growing fast...this is a stand of beech trees grouped together, notice the uniformity of leaf pattern closest in the photo...



I'm waiting on the soil to dry so I can pull the weeds and clumps of grass away from the new onions coming up. Over the years I have added many piles of grass clippings to the soil to amend it and enrich it...



Hostas waking up...



These are wild dogwood trees in full bloom in an abandoned farm-field that is now grown over...



These are two different types of blue-purple wildflowers growing in different areas...




Another bright white trillium from two weeks ago...



Not real sure what these are, but they sure grow dense and green...I will see if I can figure out what it is...



This is some sort of yellow flower growing near a spring, which I will show you next...



I have been by this spring many times, and I have never known it to go dry...notice how the moss grows really well on the rocks around and in the center of it, and the greenery at its edges as opposed to the slower growth on out...



It is spring migration season for many species of warblers, and I happened to get a glimpse of this prothonatary warbler passing through...look to the left and center of the photo and you will see a yellow spot in amongst the greenery, it has a black-cap and throat color. I wish I could have gotten a more close-up view, but I hastened to take the spare of the moment caption...

(Note: Clicking on the image will give you a better view).

(Editor's Note: Correction - I apologize, but I had mistaken the hooded warbler for a prothonatary warbler, yes, it's a hooded warbler, hence the black on top of the head and on the throat.)



Finally, this is one of my favorite spots...this is rushing, clear and cold, Tom's Creek..



Spring is my favorite of the seasons, with Autumn a close second. Thanking our Creator for it every step of the way. We should never take for grantit the health that we are afforded.

Update: Almost forgot about the two little wildflowers that I found in the woods early this spring. I consulted with my National Audubon Society Field Guide to North American Wildflowers, and seem to have identified them. I will list them in order from top to bottom. 1. Marsh Blue Violet 2. Wild Geranium. Both grow in distinctly different habitats. The 2nd flower, the Wild Geranium grows in thickets and meadows near woodlands mostly on dry ground, while the 1st flower, the Marsh Blue Violet grows near streams or a body of water, wet ground. Hence, "Marsh" Blue Violet.

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